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Many of us often have the qualities and knowledge , we even familiar with Canadian society and surely can contribute to the Canadian economy after 4 years of studies and graduated in Canada.

Now the good news to share is that you can make a successful transition from temporary to permanent residence. You should have knowledge of English or French and qualifying work experience.

Applying to stay in Canada permanently in your case is simple. You can do this under the Canadian Experience Class. Check out all the guides, information and forms you need to apply here at http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/cec/index.asp

Wish all you the best. Please leave us a comment or share with us your good news.

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The University of Iowa College of Education may soon offer a shorter, three-week program to education majors who would like to fulfill their student-teaching requirement abroad.

Margaret Crocco, the dean of the education school, said the standard study-abroad program offered to education majors is seven or eight weeks long — roughly half of the 15-week student-teaching period required. She has recently looked into creating a shorter program because the eight-week commitment is a long period of time and quite costly.

“We want to see if there is a way if we might create a shorter term of student teaching or observing in the classroom that would be available in May or June as little as three weeks,” Crocco said. “We think it is so important — we want to give people a taste of teaching and living overseas.”

Spending some time teaching abroad is beneficial for education majors, Crocco said. Sixty-five students in the college have studied abroad as part of their student-teaching requirement in the last five years.

“It’s not common that those numbers are small, because we place a couple hundred people in student teaching each year,” she said. “We’d like to see more people get involved.”

Mary Heath, a UI Office of Education Services official, said students who teach abroad pay a full semester’s tuition. The cost last year for in-state residents was $4,028, $12,139 for nonresidents.

Jennifer O’Hare, a recent graduate from the UI elementary-education program, volunteered at an elementary school in Costa Rica for a few weeks one summer but has never officially studied abroad through the university.

“I think that the more teaching experience that varies from one another, the better,” she said. “You will be more prepared when thrown into a new teaching position where the environment may not be familiar.”

Crocco said students generally focus on English-speaking countries, and the school has had students teach in Ireland, England, New Zealand, and Australia. However, small number of people have taught in countries with different native languages, including Spain and Switzerland.

“We’re placing people in local public schools, so they need to speak the public language,” she said.

Based on the feedback from both students and employers, Crocco said, when students put studying abroad on their résumé she feels it’s an enhancement to a job application.

“Students who go to another country and teach effectively must be independent, mature people,” she said.

A study-abroad expert at Michigan State University agreed with Crocco, noting experience matters when applying for a job.

“The words ‘study abroad’ on a résumé alone does not help a student get a job,” said Linda Gross, an associate director of career services at Michigan State. “What matters is the experience and the skills [they learned while abroad].”

Gross has worked with education majors who have studied abroad at Michigan State University through workshops where she teaches them how to “unpack” their study-abroad experience. A lot of students do not feel what they learned in another country is relevant in America schools, she said.

“One of my favorite questions to ask them is ‘how would you bring your study-abroad experience into the classroom [in America]?’ ” she said. “It’s not necessarily going to get them the job alone, it’s really how they talk about their entire preparation.”

source by AMY SKARNULIS, The Daily Iowan

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Going to a foreign land in pursuit of further study has enticed many with its offer of worldly experiences and opportunities. Three individuals speak about what it is really like studying abroad.

Anthony Michael

Becauseof its worldwide recognition and long history, Anthony chose the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology to pursue his interior design course.

Having studied previously at a local institution, Anthony says that the learning programme at RMIT was more structured.

“I found the head of department and lecturers more approachable. There was more of a friendship than a strict student-lecturer relationship, which made it easier to seek assistance from them. The programme co-ordinator also set up regular one-to-one meetings to review student progress and for students to voice out concerns.”

According to Anthony, studying in a foreign university will give students international exposure as they mingle with both students and staff from other parts of the world. For a design student, he adds, this is particularly important.

He says those planning to pursue their education at an overseas institution should carry out extensive research beforehand on the chosen university and country. And whilst there, he advises them to make the best of the education offered and find time to join social groups on campus.

Of course, studying in a foreign land comes with challenges and Anthony was not spared. He says having to cope with the changing seasons, especially winter was rather difficult.

“Also because you are not at home, you are not in your comfort zone and being away from your family and friends can be rather tough at times.”

But studying overseas, Anthony continues, taught him to be more independent. For example when pocket money was running out, he took on part-time jobs that included telemarketing and leaflet-distribution to help sustain his lifestyle.

Anthony considered staying on in Melbourne once he graduated but as he was offered a job back in Malaysia, he chose to return home. He has since then moved to London where he works as an interior designer.

If asked to do it all again, Anthony says he would not hesitate in choosing the same institution. “I was very happy with the education I received and the study culture so I will definitely choose the RMIT experience all over again.”

Allan Kwek

The Charles Sturt University in Australia was Kwek’s choice to continue his tertiary education. Kwek studied advertising and says he chose Charles Sturt University because it was linked to his college.

He says that the study culture at the university was different from what he was used to in that people were more willing to participate in classes and were more outspoken, which he found to be good. However, what he found challenging was trying to understand the Australian accent.

Like most students studying overseas, funds were scarce so Kwek had to look for an alternative to supplement his pocket money. “I took on jobs as a chef at a few small restaurants cooking Chinese food. These restaurants allowed me a decent wage for my living expenses,” he says.

After graduating Kwek worked in Australia for two years but soon realised that home is really where the heart is; he decided to come back.

“Even though the wages and the lifestyle is better there, Malaysia is still home to me and I do not regret my decision at all,” Kwek says.

Kwek presently works as an animation producer, working mainly on commercials, TV series and anything that requires graphics or animating and has been in this field for about a year-and-a-half.

In his opinion, employers take higher education seriously but he feels that it does not stop there.

“One must have the passion and knowledge in his chosen field. Take advertising for example, you cannot be an advertiser solely through books as you need the passion for knowledge and selling. You need to be in the mind of consumers and think like them. It’s all about presenting and selling yourself at the end of the day,” he explains.

For those planning to go overseas, Kwek’s advice is to go with an open mind. “It was a good experience for me to wake up to something different and unfamiliar every day. If the opportunity presents itself, leave and come back with knowledge.”

“And when you’re there, never forget your roots.”

Audrey See Tho

A psychology major at the Stony Brook University in New York, See Tho says she chose to study at this university because of its high quality of research and teaching in psychology.

“I also chose the university because it is part of a network of New York state public universities called ‘State University of New York’ and it’s relatively near distance to New York City,” she explains.

See Tho says that everything is discussion-based in class and if you don’t raise your hand and ask questions, you lose out. “Professors are also very willing to mentor students and are always welcoming students to come to their office for questions or just a chat,” she adds.

Studying away from home has helped See Tho attain independence and leadership skills as she had to do everything on her own from grocery shopping to paying the bills. Together with the good, studying abroad brought with it a set of challenges.

“The distance from home also brings various stresses such as homesickness, loneliness and in winter when the sun sets really early, one can easily get depressed,” See Tho says.

She also had to cut down on her spending as she realised she could not just rely on her parents for funds so took up a job in the library as a student assistant.

See Tho says that she would definitely encourage students to study overseas as it has exposed her to so many different people and experiences and she now looks at things from new perspectives.

“New York City has broadened my vision of the world. I have been provided with so many opportunities and have met so many interesting people during my time here,” she elaborates.

Once she graduates, See Tho plans to stay on in the US if she is offered an opportunity. “I do not, however, intend to live here for the rest of my life. Malaysia is my home and I want to bring better changes to my home country with the knowledge I have gained overseas.”

Source by Gregory Basil, New Straits Times MY

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When we signed up for study abroad, we were told in so many words what to expect and what the experience was going to be like. We were told that we would visit historical sites, monuments and museums while also getting the opportunity to experience a different culture while earning college credit.

Well, after embarking on the journey and making it home, I can tell you that those things are true, but what it is more difficult to explain is just how memorable and life changing study abroad can be.

While I’m not going to sit here and say that I suddenly discovered a solution to all my problems while drinking a beer in London or found the meaning of life while sipping on wine in France, I will tell you that the things I saw are something that will stay with me for the rest of my life.

The study abroad I went on was a 10-day trip themed after D-Day, the 1944 Allied invasion of France. Our journey took us over the Atlantic into London, down to Portsmouth, across the English Channel into Normandy and ended in Paris.

Beach of Normandy

While on the beaches of Normandy, I had a great epiphany that I think is worth sharing, one that I think encapsulates the thing that makes study abroad so valuable. What I realized was that no amount of reading, lectures, movies or any other retelling of an event can come close to actually experiencing it for your self.

Only when I was standing on the damp sand of Omaha Beach, staring from the water’s edge back to the towering cliffs, did the magnitude of what the Americans accomplished really sink in. Only when I was standing in a crater on Pointe du Hoc did the true power of the navel warships I had read about truly make sense.

My point is that there is no way to completely explain the feelings and thoughts a place will evoke without being there. That is the true magic of study abroad. Through the program, you can go to those places, experience those emotions and create those memories.

So to those of you who are considering study abroad, I hope this helps inform your decision. Remember, you only live once so get out there and see what the world has to offer.

Source: The Lion’s Roar

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Chinese students at xiamen University
Chinese students in the classroom. The consumer class in China, India and other Asian countries is growing at a fast rate. Photograph: Alamy

Nearly 100 million people will enter the consumer class (annual income of more than $5,000) by 2015 in six south-east Asian countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), according to a report by the Boston Consulting Group. Another report by the McKinsey Global Institute asserts that between 2005 and 2025, China and India will see their aggregate urban consumption increase seven-fold and six-fold, respectively.

This growing consumer class in Asia will expand a new segment of students who are willing to pay for a global educational experience while staying in their home country or region. I call this segment “glocals”– global aspirations with local experiences.

Glocals are characterised by aspirations that usually outstrip both their ability to afford a full fee-paying overseas education and their academic merit to gain admission to an overseas institution with financial aid.

The traditional segment of international students go abroad for a combination of reasons such as career advancement, quality of education, immigration or the experience of living abroad. Glocals differ from this traditional segment as they look for career advancement and quality of education, without having to go very far from home.

In addition to limitations regarding financial means and academic merit, glocals may also decide to stay within their country or region due to regional mobility initiatives. For instance, the ASEAN Economic Community, aims to transform the south-east Asian region into a common market with free flow of goods, services, investment and workers, which will benefit students as well.

Glocals represent the segment of students who typically seek transnational education (TNE) including international branch campuses, twinning arrangements and online education.

The growth of Dubai as a destination for many south Asian students through international branch campuses is one indicator of growth in this student population. According to the Observatory, with 37 branch campuses, One in five branch campuses in the world is hosted by the UAE.

Malaysia recently announced that it received applications from 25 foreign universities to set up branch campuses, and that the country plans to reach a goal of enrolling 150,000 international students by 2015.

China has also been proactive in offering 1+2+1 dual degree programmes for a decade. A recent announcement by Indian regulatorsto allow joint-degrees and twinning collaborations between Indian and foreign institutions are also expected to expand the base of glocals. High-quality collaborations, such as the one between Yale-NUS in Singapore, are also anticipated to attract glocals.

Countries such as the UK and Australia have been pioneers in offering transnational education and are best positioned to serve glocals. Nearly half of all international education activity for the UK and one-third for Australia is through TNE or “offshore” provision. In terms of absolute numbers, more than 400,000 students were enrolled in the UK institutions through TNE. More than 100,000 students were enrolled in Australian institutions.

Undoubtedly, students who seek overseas education will continue to grow at a faster pace. It is the glocal segment, however, that is likely to present the next big opportunity for institutions that want to increase their global profile. The needs of glocal students, combined with a changing institutional, demographic, economic and political landscape in emerging Asia calls for an innovative and strategic approach to engage with internationalisation in Asia.

Internationalisation strategies need to move beyond student recruitment and target collaborative relationships of varying complexity and intensity, ranging from short-term exchanges to twinning international branch campuses. Undeniably, strategies will differ according to the priorities and resources of institutions, but higher education institutions need to be prepared to adapt to a major shift in student profiles and corresponding engagement strategies with Asia.

To sum up, a new segment of students is expanding. These are students who have global aspirations but will find more opportunities of education and employment mobility within local regions. This presents a vital opportunity for foreign institutions to understand glocals and strategically engage them through innovative transnational education.

As Arnold Glasgow rightfully said: “The trouble with the future is that is usually arrives before we’re ready for it.”

by Rahul Choudaha, from The Guardian , UK

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PETRONAS TWIN TOWER NATIONAL FLAG

Inside Educity Iskandr: a multi-national university partnership in Malaysia. Photograph: Andy Wong/AP

Transnational education is booming and the forms in which it is delivered are proliferating all the time. Ever increasing numbers of UK universities are setting up franchising arrangements, 2+1 models, or even full-blown overseas campuses.

The 350-acre campus at Educity Iskandar will be shared by no fewer than eight international universities, including three from the UK.NewcastleSouthampton and Reading universities will take their place alongside the Netherlands Maritime Institute of Technology and the Singaporean private university Raffles. Australia’s Monash and a Californian cinematic art school associated with Pinewood Studios are in talks with Iskandar’s management, leaving just one spot left for another, as yet unknown, international institution.

Students from all of the universities will live together in one giant international student village and will share sports and leisure facilities far beyond those any single university could afford, including a 14,000-seater stadium and an Olympic-length swimming pool.

In the 1990s Malaysia singled out higher education as one of its strategic investments. Historically Malaysia has sent its students abroad for their education, now it is preparing to reverse that position, it wants to become the hub of its region drawing thousands students from across south-east Asia to its universities in huge numbers. Attracting foreign universities to set up overseas campuses is part of the that plan.

The Iskandar special economic region in Johor lies at the southern-most tip of Malaysia, just 5km from the border with Singapore. For Reg Jordan, CEO and provost of Newcastle’s Medical School in Malaysia both of these things – the location and the financial incentives associated with the special economic region – were major factors.

Newcastle University got the call in 2004. It was invited to bring medicine and biomedical sciences to the project. Jordan said it represented a “golden opportunity” for Newcastle to develop its internationalisation strategy.

“Like many civic universities in the UK we have little flags all over the world which have normally grown up through research collaborations and all the rest of it. But our vice-chancellor felt it was time to pick a few strategic areas and plant one or two large flags. The international campus here – a fully owned branch of Newcastle University – is a golden opportunity to do that in south-east Asia, and brings us to the new markets. The World Bank will tell you that there’s going to be an increasingly exponential demand for higher education but it’s largely going to come from Asia and south-east Asia,” Jordan said.

Newcastle has existing partnerships with higher education providers in the centre of Singapore, which is just 35 minutes away from the new campus in Iskandar, so the chance to build on these was not to be missed, Jordan explained. “The growth triangle of Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia is a very big market. We already had a presence here so when the operation came to put our own full international branch campus, our building, our staff, right next door to where we have other interests that became a quite interesting proposition.”

Planting a large operation in the centre of south-east Asia will also help Newcastle maximise the value of its intellectual property. “For the university at large it also gives us a base through which the value added business can be added through the research endeavours back in the UK,” Jordan said.

Jordan also sees the occupants of his south-east Asian outpost as playing “ambassadorial roles” for the north-east of England. “A colleague of mine said that one of the best things that Newcastle University could do for the north east of England is to be globally linked. We have a lot of ambassadorial roles, in a sense.”

Southampton, which will open the doors of its new engineering faculty in Malaysia in October this year, is similarly excited by the location. Professor Mark Spearing, pro vice-chancellor, international, said the location was a “very natural fit for us” given the number of important engineering companies which operate in the region. “Malaysia is the hub of hi-tech industry … Dyson, Rolls Royce, Lloyds Register and BAE Systems are all interested in working with us and employing our students.”

Of the host country’s motives he said: “Malaysia recognises that it is a small country in a region of giants so it wants to move into higher value added activities, not manufacturing but design and engineering, and it needs a very strong education system to do this.”

But what of the practicalities?

Rob Robson is CEO and provost of the University of Reading in Malaysia, which is currently offering english language and business courses in temporary accomodation in Johor Bahru. When the full campus opens in 2015, it will be delivering, chemistry, finance, real estate, pharmacy, law and construction.

He says that all of the partner universities must do well for the project to thrive. “If one institution does badly, and gets a poor reputation, that will be harmful for all of us.”

The management of a large-scale project where organisations’ fortunes are interrelated is “a layer above what we do in a regular university.”

“We all have our own brands out here but what more can we do to be greater than the sum of our parts … working together is going to be terribly important.”

For Spearing, the key to smoothing the process of opening the school was “getting our people on the ground quickly”, rather than trying to arrange things remotely, and “having a lot of native language speakers involved. We had a target of 50% locally employed academics and that was not difficult at all.” All of Southampton’s administrative staff in Malaysia are local, although they are supported and guided through the processes by UK staff at the moment, he said.

“Procurement and purchasing all went smoothly because our staff speak the language,” he said.

But what about student discipline? Or student health and welfare in the student village?

Robson foresees that problems on site “will need to be solved by committee”, He says initial talks have taken place about setting up some kind of “parliament type system, or council to settle disputes”.

This council will also “act as a pressure group on commercial aspects,” since the international student village and leisure facilities will be operated by private companies.

There are a myriad of other practical issues to be dealt with – such as getting the balance of staff. The Malaysia government has warned overseas universities against poaching too many academic staff from indigenous universities so the Iskandar project will recruit globally. Robson said “obviously we’re very keen to use Reading’s UK staff to begin with but we will want to switch to local staff on lower wages when possible.”

At the moment, because it was first to open, Newcastle is operating its medicine faculty like a university in miniature, paying for everything – IT, library, student welfare – itself. So all three of the UK universities are looking forward to merging what they can of these services to share costs in the future. Spearing said “one of the huge attractions of EduCity is the opportunity to share resources and spread risk.” This frees the universities up “to concentrate on academic delivery”.

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional.

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A lot of students and their families are justifiably concerned about the cost and quality of education in the United States.

A hundred US colleges now have a cost of attendance (COA) exceeding $50,000; two years ago, only five did. Worse still, the price tag continues to escalate at around 4% per year.

 Add to this state of affairs the revelations contained in the book, “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses,” which asserts:  that 36% of students “did not demonstrate any significant improvement in learning” after four years of college.

You have every reason in the world to look elsewhere for alternative educational opportunities. The world, however, might very well be on your doorstep in the form of our Canadian neighbors to the north. Canadian universities have a high standard of educational rigor, their COA (depending on province) is usually much lower, and most award degrees in three years, not the six years it seems to take students at many US schools nowadays.

 Most Canadian universities have big, safe, and in many instances, beautiful campuses

Be aware that Canadian universities are different from their US counterparts. In the US, the federal government has various programs such as FAFSA and Title IX that ensure some consistency within the university system. The Canadian universities, on the other hand, are funded and regulated by their provinces or territories. Consequently, there isn’t a lot of uniformity among Canadian universities. If you apply to the University of Toronto in Ontario, and McGill, in Quebec, you will use different applications, and confront different admission’s requirements (though most of the schools do take SAT I, SAT II, ACT, and FAFSA forms) and have varying costs depending on your intended major.

Another minor note, educational terms and degrees are different in Canada than in the US. In Canada: “college” means a two-year school, while “university” refers to the four-year schools. Additionally, many Canadian universities award a bachelor’s degree after completing three years of university. A student then needs another year to gain an honors degree, which is essential for getting into graduate school.

There are 90 universities to choose among in Canada. Some are the most competitive and eminent in the world. McGill University in Montreal is ranked regularly among the top 20 universities in the world. University of Toronto, with a number of Nobel Prize winners among its faculty, has many elite departments.

Additionally, professional studies in medicine, dentistry, and engineering, for example, start at the undergraduate level and lead to graduate school. Coursework is challenging and expectations are high.

The cost of university education, though certainly below that of comparable US universities, depends on where you choose to attend. It also depends upon what it is you’re majoring in. At the University of British Columbia, which is ranked 36th (ARWU) in the world, for international students, the annual tuition is around $23,000 (again, it depends on major—and international students are not allowed to study dentistry or medicine). At McGill, the annual tuition for international students in a standard BA program is just more than $17,000 annually. Tuition, however, will vary by major, and fees will vary by meal plan, or even by dormitory selected. Be aware that the provincial government has announced that tuition rates will be rising annually by 7-11% for, at least, the next seven years. Still, even with these expected escalations, the costs are still well under comparable American universities.

Another concern. If a large campus intimidates you, Canadian schools are enormous. University of British Columbia has 20,000 undergraduates (about the size of Boston University); the University of Toronto, with its three campuses, enrolls just under 50,000 undergraduates.

by Ralph Becker, a resident of Long Beach, has been counseling students for seven years. A former Yale Alumni interviewer, he holds a certificate in college counseling from UCLA Extension, and has published SAT* Vocab 800 Books A, B, C, & D.

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