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Posts Tagged ‘Postgraduate’

As a third-year commerce student at Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business, Marcel Glaesser spent an academic semester at the University of Mannheim last year. After completing his studies in Germany, he decided to stay longer and landed a six-month contract with BMW in Munich.

A worker puts an emblem on a BMW 5 series car at the plant in the Bavarian city of Dingolfing.

“The coolest thing is that I got to do so many things,” he recalls, citing marketing-related assignments that included preparations for the company’s annual meeting held in a stadium, complete with a display of prototype cars.

His experience typifies a growing trend among undergraduate and graduate business students to study and work abroad while earning their business degree. For Mr. Glaesser, Germany held appeal because he was born there before his family came to Canada 10 years ago. He took his classes in English at Mannheim, but had to brush up on his German to work at BMW.

His advice to other students is “go abroad, go abroad. It will set you apart.”

The same message comes from Canadian business schools, some with formal and informal arrangements to promote international experience opportunities for students before they graduate.

For example, Beedie recently signed an agreement with the British Columbia and Caribbean branches of the Certified General Accountants for an accounting student to spend a work term in Barbados every year.

“We feel it is a great opportunity for students because they get to work and learn,” says Andrew Gemino, associate dean of undergraduate programs. “We would love to do more,” he adds. “It is a matter of finding those opportunities and working on them.”

About 1,700 Beedie commerce undergraduates – about half of the enrolment – are at one stage or another of the school’s co-op program, either completing a prerequisite semester, applying for a placement or actually on the job. Every semester, between 170 and 240 students are actually working, with about five per cent choosing to go abroad.

“Through a variety of different ways, the students are becoming more comfortable and more interested in working internationally,” says Shauna Tonsaker, co-op education program director.

Her office provides financial and other assistance to students before, during and after their work stint. Prior to departure, all students complete an online course to minimize culture shock. This summer, students have chosen placements with major firms in half a dozen countries, including China, Japan and Germany.

“They get the experience of working in a culturally diverse work environment, gain experience for the first time of living on their own and get a global perspective,” she says. “It is of huge value when they are out there to apply for careers, locally and internationally, and can bring that [experience] to the workplace.”

Now completing his fourth year at Beedie in business marketing, Mr. Glaesser says the biggest bonus of working abroad was his new level of confidence. “It was the first time working in any big organization and seeing how it works from the inside,” he recalls. “For me, it was really valuable.”

excerpt from The Globe and Mail, by JENNIFER LEWINGTON

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A lot of students and their families are justifiably concerned about the cost and quality of education in the United States.

A hundred US colleges now have a cost of attendance (COA) exceeding $50,000; two years ago, only five did. Worse still, the price tag continues to escalate at around 4% per year.

 Add to this state of affairs the revelations contained in the book, “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses,” which asserts:  that 36% of students “did not demonstrate any significant improvement in learning” after four years of college.

You have every reason in the world to look elsewhere for alternative educational opportunities. The world, however, might very well be on your doorstep in the form of our Canadian neighbors to the north. Canadian universities have a high standard of educational rigor, their COA (depending on province) is usually much lower, and most award degrees in three years, not the six years it seems to take students at many US schools nowadays.

 Most Canadian universities have big, safe, and in many instances, beautiful campuses

Be aware that Canadian universities are different from their US counterparts. In the US, the federal government has various programs such as FAFSA and Title IX that ensure some consistency within the university system. The Canadian universities, on the other hand, are funded and regulated by their provinces or territories. Consequently, there isn’t a lot of uniformity among Canadian universities. If you apply to the University of Toronto in Ontario, and McGill, in Quebec, you will use different applications, and confront different admission’s requirements (though most of the schools do take SAT I, SAT II, ACT, and FAFSA forms) and have varying costs depending on your intended major.

Another minor note, educational terms and degrees are different in Canada than in the US. In Canada: “college” means a two-year school, while “university” refers to the four-year schools. Additionally, many Canadian universities award a bachelor’s degree after completing three years of university. A student then needs another year to gain an honors degree, which is essential for getting into graduate school.

There are 90 universities to choose among in Canada. Some are the most competitive and eminent in the world. McGill University in Montreal is ranked regularly among the top 20 universities in the world. University of Toronto, with a number of Nobel Prize winners among its faculty, has many elite departments.

Additionally, professional studies in medicine, dentistry, and engineering, for example, start at the undergraduate level and lead to graduate school. Coursework is challenging and expectations are high.

The cost of university education, though certainly below that of comparable US universities, depends on where you choose to attend. It also depends upon what it is you’re majoring in. At the University of British Columbia, which is ranked 36th (ARWU) in the world, for international students, the annual tuition is around $23,000 (again, it depends on major—and international students are not allowed to study dentistry or medicine). At McGill, the annual tuition for international students in a standard BA program is just more than $17,000 annually. Tuition, however, will vary by major, and fees will vary by meal plan, or even by dormitory selected. Be aware that the provincial government has announced that tuition rates will be rising annually by 7-11% for, at least, the next seven years. Still, even with these expected escalations, the costs are still well under comparable American universities.

Another concern. If a large campus intimidates you, Canadian schools are enormous. University of British Columbia has 20,000 undergraduates (about the size of Boston University); the University of Toronto, with its three campuses, enrolls just under 50,000 undergraduates.

by Ralph Becker, a resident of Long Beach, has been counseling students for seven years. A former Yale Alumni interviewer, he holds a certificate in college counseling from UCLA Extension, and has published SAT* Vocab 800 Books A, B, C, & D.

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TROY University is different from most institutions of higher learning. Rather than preparing students for jobs, TROY prepare them for what’s ahead – life – opportunity – surprises. Yes, the future can be unpredictable, but the people who succeed in the years to come will do so because of preparation, planning and drive. These are just a few of the defining characteristics of TROY students.

Best of all, no matter where life takes you, you’ll never be far from one of the more than 60 TROY teaching sites across the U.S. and around the world. You can complete your MBA in Malaysia and still graduate from TROY. Why wait?

TROY is giving yourself options, and no one is better at that than TROY.

The purpose of the Master of Business Administration program is to offer students an opportunity to acquire proficiency in general business management and decision making skills which will enable them to carry out managerial responsibilities in both private and public sectors. As a result of successfully completing the MBA program, graduates should improve their ability to apply strong problem-solving skills to strategic planning process in organizations and to use written and verbal communication skills effectively to communicate the results of their problem-solving analyses and recommendations. The MBA is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP).

Complete in Malaysia with cheaper tuition fee and living expenses.

Admission Requirement: First Degree (with honors)

Course Duration: 16 months

Tuition Fee: RM28,000 ( USD9,333)

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