Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘university’

At the register section, Thao Tran, a fulltime student in SCCC commented while waiting in line to pay her tuition fee “My tuition for this fall quarter is cheaper than last quarter because I did not have any English as Second Language (ESL) classes”, she said. One of her friends, Nancy, who is American, was surprised about Tran’s comment. Looking at Tran’s amount, Nancy thought Tran was taking about 30 credits for that quarter because Tran was paying $3,000. She asked Tran why she is taking so many credits this quarter and how she will be able to complete all homework. “They are just 3 classes which are 15 credits”, Tran said. Nancy was astonished and asked Tran “Why is your tuition so expensive? Tran replied “I am an International student so I have to pay more than American students.”

Being an International student means students have to be prepared to pay the higher tuition fee that is often three times than the local students.

Tuan Nguyen – another International student, is saying that he is so busy and being stress with homework. “I have to take at least 12 credits every quarter. However, tuition fee for 12 and 15 credits is not much different so I decide to take 15 credits to save money and time”, he said. One of his host family member asked “Why do International students come to America to study when it is more expensive than their own countries?” Tuan replied that” American education is more valuable in my country to our employers, so when I go back, I will have higher chance of getting the career of my dream.”

According to the Institute of International Education (IIE) – Office of the Spokesman in Washington, DC, the number of International students at colleges and universities in the United States has increased by 8% to an all-time high of 671,616. In 2008/09 the number has increased by 16%. This represents the largest percentage increase in International student enrollments since 1980/81. Those finding were released at the Open Doors conference in 2009, and the annual survey report published by (IIE) with funding from the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

International students pay higher tuition as if they were non-residential students. Furthermore, they haven’t previously paid the state taxes. In general, the taxes people pay still contributes to their kid education. More than that, they are required to pay for insurance which is included in the tuition only if they are not already covered in their countries.

Another reason, the international students generally receive their educated, and return home. They are not part of American’s community, and will not contribute to the community wellbeing when they leave. Most students who are from other countries and enrolling in SCCC said they would like to return home to work later.

Sibel- a Turkish student is going to graduate the AA degree in next two quarters, said that she will go back home after she graduates. She said “I will use all knowledge that I have learned to work for my family business. The majority of International student have the same response that American education is worth any price. In theory, again, native students are from American’s community, to whom people wish to give the advantages of education, and once educated they will remain part of the community and enrich it, both by their skills and by the higher taxes they will pay. Therefore, the community gains more from educating native students than overseas ones, and is willing to subsidies them.

Also because the number of oversea students is just increasing really fast, so charging higher fee for overseas students is a way to protect local students. Otherwise, seats at internationally reputed colleges will be flooded by rich students from other countries. The tuition fee is a way to limit the quota for applicants.

In addition, their economic impact—tuition and fees, living expenses for themselves and their dependents, and U.S. support mainly from the schools they attend. As it has been year after year, more than 60 percent International students receive the majority of their funds from personal and family financial assets. The next largest funding source is the college or university they are attending, according to the Institute of International Education (IIE).

Source: New City Collegian, by Trish Tran

Read Full Post »

Each new student to be assigned an enrolment specialist and to develop a learning plan.

First-year students entering the University of British Columbia’s Vancouver campus this fall can expect a more personal touch, thanks to changes the university is making to its enrolment procedures. The enrolment changes are among several UBC is implementing in admissions and student-support services for undergraduates.

All new undergraduate students at UBC Vancouver will be assigned to an enrolment services professional, or ESP, who can answer questions and help students resolve problems involving financial planning, eligibility for bursaries and scholarships, emergency funding, registration and a host of other services.

“This represents a radical change for our organization,” said Lisa Collins, associate registrar and project director for the new enrolment-services model. The program, dubbed Names Not Numbers, aims to establish a stronger relationship between the university and its students and will “bring the small campus experience to what is a large campus here at UBC Vancouver,” said Ms. Collins. It will also help alert university officials should a student run into trouble, she added.

UBC is in the process of hiring 23 ESPs who will be assigned to students in June as they register for fall classes. Each ESP eventually will oversee about 300 students for the duration of their undergraduate careers. UBC expects to hire some 65 ESPs by June 2013, as the program is rolled out to include all undergraduate students at UBC Vancouver.

UBC’s enrolment services estimates that it has about 200,000 interactions with its students and prospective students each year, many of which take place online. For many students, that will continue to be the case; they may opt to meet with their ESP just once or twice over the course of their undergraduate experience, Ms. Collins said. “But for those students who would really benefit from an ongoing relationship with an ESP, we want that to be there for them.”

The project is part of a broader UBC initiative aimed at enhancing student engagement. The changes include a shift to broad-based admissions that the university announced earlier this year and a proposal to introduce a “learning plan” for all first-year students.

Learning plan in the works

The faculties of arts and sciences and the school of kinesiology already have piloted several versions of a learning plan for some of their students. UBC’s campus-wide strategy would see the program expanded to include all-first year students within the next year.

A learning plan is an organizational tool that students use to establish their learning goals. As currently configured, the UBC learning plan is divided into three parts: active learning and scholarly engagement; degree planning and career exploration; campus life and community engagement. Students are encouraged to select various workshops, seminars and activities that UBC offers throughout the year to help them meet their goals and to enter those into their learning plan.

“We give them a way of thinking about three parts of their life as an undergrad and ask them to establish some goals in these areas, to look ahead and see how they might achieve those goals,” said Paul Harrison, associate dean for students in the faculty of science.

Starting this fall, all first-year science students will receive a learning plan template as part of their orientation package. They will be assigned a peer coach – a senior student who will explain how the learning plan works. Students can refer to it throughout the year when they meet with their peer coach and with academic advisers, professors and other staff, all of whom can help students shape the plan, spot weaknesses and point out opportunities students may have overlooked. Students will be encouraged to update and revise the plan regularly. Dr. Harrison would like to see it become an online tool that students can use throughout their academic careers. Arts students can already access their learning plans online.

The broad-based admissions process that UBC adopted this year for its Vancouver campus requires applicants to UBC to submit, along with their high-school marks, a personal profile. The profile involves answering several questions that are designed to give the university a better understanding of an applicant’s personal characteristics and non-academic strengths. Ms. Collins, the associate registrar, said the transition to the new application process has gone smoothly. “We are learning a lot more about our students,” said Ms. Collins, who acts as one of the readers of personal profiles.

UBC saw a drop of 12 percent in the number of applications it received this year from last, she said, most likely because the new application is more involved and takes longer to complete. Other institutions that have moved to broad-based admissions have experienced similar declines, she noted. UBC receives about 300,000 applications to undergraduate programs a year and last year enrolled 5,900 new first-year students.

“We will be analyzing this year’s admission cycle data to see whether the type of applicant also changed,” said Ms. Collins, but added that UBC is confident that its “applicant pool remains strong and admission is still a highly competitive process at UBC.”

Taken from universityaffairs.ca , Rosanna Tamburri

Read Full Post »

Ranking of 48 countries, organized by Universitas 21, looks at various measures of what constitutes a “good” educational system.

While there are any number of well-regarded global rankings of universities and colleges, these don’t reveal anything about national systems of higher education and the environment which different countries provide for their institutions and students. Given the significance of higher education in economic growth and development, it’s important for governments to be able to benchmark their systems. More transparency and clarity is needed to encourage knowledge-sharing, collaboration and development of opportunities for students in all countries.

Today sees the first publication of a new ranking of national HE systems, based on research at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne into data from 48 countries. The ranking is organised by Universitas 21, an international research network of 24 universities and colleges whose membership works together to encourage international mobility and engagement between staff and students (the network has two Canadian members, the University of British Columbia and McGill University).

The ranking is based on 20 different measures that the researchers believe are critical to what makes a “good” HE system, grouped under four umbrella headings:

  1. resources (investment by government and private sector)
  2. output (research and its impact, as well as the production of an educated workforce which meets labour market needs)
  3. connectivity (international networks and collaboration which protects a system against insularity) and
  4. environment (government policy and regulation, diversity and participation opportunities).

Population size is accounted for in the calculations.

Canada is placed third globally in the ranking, behind only the U.S. and Sweden, and above international competitors for overseas students such as the U.K. and Australia. Its position is based primarily on being ranked first for resources – a reflection of the level of investment into the system – and third for outputs. Canada’s position may have been higher but for lower ratings for environment (29th, a reflection of a relative lack of diversity in terms of types of HE institutions and the composition of the student population) and connectivity (17th, meaning relatively less international collaboration and involvement of overseas students in research).

universitas_1
Source: Universitas 21.

Generally, there is a strong relationship between resources and output – illustrating the importance of funding support. Of the top eight countries in output, only the U.K. and Australia are not in the top eight for resources. There is some evidence of groupings of neighbouring countries. The four Nordic countries are all in the top seven; four east Asian countries (Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan and Korea) are clustered together at ranks 18 to 22; Eastern European countries (Ukraine, Czech Republic, Poland, Slovenia) are together in the middle range; and the Latin American countries (Chile, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico) also cluster together. While many countries don’t feel they can be a world leader, they do want to remain competitive with their neighbours.

Government funding of higher education as a percentage of GDP is highest in Finland, Norway and Denmark, but when private expenditures are added in, funding is highest in the U.S., Korea, Canada and Chile. Investment in research and development is highest in Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland. The U.S. dominates the total output of research journal articles, but Sweden is the biggest producer of articles per capita. The nations whose research has the greatest impact are Switzerland, the Netherlands, the U.S., the U.K. and Denmark. While the U.S. and U.K. have the world’s top institutions in rankings, the depth of world-class higher education institutions per capita is best in Switzerland, Sweden, Israel and Denmark.

The highest participation rates in higher education are in Korea, Finland, Greece, the U.S., Canada and Slovenia. The countries with the largest proportion of workers with a higher-level education are Russia, Canada, Israel, the U.S., Ukraine, Taiwan and Australia. Finland, Denmark, Singapore, Norway and Japan have the highest ratio of researchers in the economy.

universitas_2
Source: Universitas 21.

International students form the highest proportions of total student numbers in Australia, Singapore, Austria, the U.K. and Switzerland. International research collaboration is most prominent in Indonesia, Switzerland, Hong Kong, Denmark, Belgium and Austria. China, India, Japan and the U.S. rank in the bottom 25 percent of countries for international research collaboration. In all but eight countries at least 50 percent of students were female, the lowest being in India and Korea.

We hope the Universitas 21 Ranking will be recognised as an important reference point for governments and everyone involved in HE, as a means of ensuring recognition of the value of HE to economic development and the international standing of a country’s institutions.

Taken from universityaffairs.ca by Ross Williams

Ross Williams is a professor at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne.

Read Full Post »

 There are now more than 200,000 education apps available to download on the app store. If you laid them all end-to-end, they wouldn’t reach very far, because in physical terms they’re nothing more than electronic patterns on tiny little magnets in your iPad – but there are still a huge amount with variety to suit every taste.

Most of them cost money, however, and if you laid all that end-to-end, you’d have several million pounds in a long line. Not everyone wants to pay for their apps, so we’re having a look at our favourite free ones currently available. We can’t pretend in any objective way that these apps are the ‘best’ free apps, but they’re all interesting and fun in their own ways.

As it happens, free apps are relatively few and far between, and most of these use a ‘freemium’ model – free to download, but you have to pay for full functionality. It’s actually quite tricky to find many truly free, truly useful apps in fact, but that’s capitalism for you.

iTunes U

This is the best free education app currently available. It has frightening potential for such a simple idea, and will in all likelihood revolutionise how education even happens at university-level – but you don’t have to be a student to get tons of utility out of it.

In the simplest terms, it’s iBooks, but for textbooks, but that description doesn’t do it remote justice. Any educational institution in the world can upload anything it likes, and leave it there for anyone in the world to find it. At the moment, for instance, you can get free podcasts on all sorts of esoteric subjects from Oxford University experts, you can get a free subscription to a comprehensive Yale course on the American Revolution, or you can enjoy a ten-part multimedia course on writing plays from the Open University. And as soon as people start getting wise to it, the sky is the limit for iTunes U – a free resource of learning on everything, perhaps.

Any lecturer at any university could upload her course notes for you to read, if she wanted. Or she could upload them for the benefit of her class alone. Or she could sell them if she wanted. Schoolteachers can do just the same, harnessing the capacity of the iPad to force their lesson plans down their pupils’ throats in all sorts of innovative multimedia ways.

This app demonstrates exactly why Apple is so awesomely rich.

Leafsnap

Moving from the universal to the specific, Leafsnap is much more specialised app, but it’s such a wonderful realisation of the teaching power of tablet computing that it’s been included at number two in the list.

As you might guess from the title, it’s an app that teaches you about leaves. That’s not all it does, though; it has a massive database of plants from around the world, with lovely hi-res images of their leaves, branches, fruits, cones, bark and so on, and plenty of written information, too.

The really clever bits, though, are yet to come. First of these is the ‘snap’: Leafsnap actually lets you photograph a leaf with the iPad’s onboard camera, and will then endeavour to identify its species. You can then tag where you found this species using GPS, so other leafsnappers can see, thereby building up a database of local flora all over the world. It’s fascinating, even if you never thought you liked leaves all that much.

Exoplanet

This wouldn’t have been possible even a few years ago, because we didn’t know of enough exoplanets – planets, that is, that exist outside of our solar system. These days, people are finding them all the time, like wads of change behind a galaxy-sized sofa. They’re finding them so often, in fact, that this morning my exoplanet app downloaded the details of 26 more justannounced by NASA.

This is a lovely little app: little more than a database of planets and what we know about them, and a whacking great zoomable map of the Milky Way to show you where they all sit in space. As a consequence, the first thing I learned is quite how mind-bogglingly huge our galaxy is. The second thing is that astronomers are not good at picking snappy names for planets, unless, say, HD 20794 d is your idea of a grand name from the Final Frontier.

3D Brain

Human biology this time, with an absolutely exhaustive pictographic guide to all the many parts of the human brain. You can see, in the obligatory 3D, all the different structures of our most complex organ, and get comprehensive but easy-to-comprehend information explaining what they do.

Fight the temptation to lick the screen and pretend to be a zombie.

Merck PSE HD

You wouldn’t know it from the name, but this is the best free periodic table app around. It’s perhaps a little more drab than some of the flashier, paid-for periodic table apps on the market, but it’s hardly a meagre package in itself.

There’s a wealth of information on all the elements, with all the chemical detail you could hope for (I’m assuming, with my A in Chemistry GCSE…), as well as a potted history, some information on whoever discovered it, and plenty of pictures.

I’ve found myself amazed about quite how many metals there really are that we never see or use.

TED

The TED talks (Technology Entertainment and Design) are a must-watch series of in-depth talks given by experts in all sorts of fields imaginable. Mere mortals like ourselves are far from able to afford the thousands of dollars required to attend the talks in person, but they’ve been available to view for free since 2006 – amassing more than 500m views.

This app will let you watch them all. There is plenty of material, anything from tech giants on futurology and social networking to medical researchers discussing cutting-edge surgery techniques. There’s material on gene therapy, on art, on music and even on the psychology of humour. Basically, there is something serious and mind-expandingly meaty for everyone, and it’s all well tagged, meaning you can explore surrounding concepts and watch related videos with disgusting ease.

Your best bet is to download your favourite videos, pack some headphones, and while away the hours on a long journey by filling yourself with arcane knowledge.

Mindsnacks

While your iPad probably isn’t the best tool to teach you to read the works of Baudelaire or Goethe from scratch, it does provide a platform for learner-linguists to grasp the basics of a foreign language. Mindsnacks’ simple series of word games is a particularly fine example.

They have apps for students of French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Chinese, with more on the way. They’re very much for beginners, but the games are fun, and you really can learn while doing. It’s best for vocab and phrases, rather than learning grammar, but languages are speaking, aren’t they?

This is another of those freemium apps – you’ll get a basic package for nothing, but full access costs a very reasonable £2.99.

Groupboard

‘Free online shared whiteboard software’ is not the sexiest of the educational concepts, but it is a potentially transformative idea. If a class divides into groups for a project, a collaborative whiteboard space means they can get all sorts of things done together without having to crowd around a paper. With wi-fi access, they won’t even need to be on the same continent (though they’ll probably be limited to remaining on Earth; space Internet isn’t cheap). Chat functions are included, too. We’ll leave you to work out the possibilities for this one.

Evernote

Hands-down the best note-taking app out there, Evernote is the epitome of everything cloud computing stands for. One account can sync with virtually every mobile device that exists, and sharing and transmitting your data couldn’t be easier.

This is perfect for, say, taking notes in a lecture and then accessing them at home on your desktop, or sending them to friends who haven’t quite made it in that morning, or making to-do lists, or just about anything text-related really.

Color Uncovered

If you’ll excuse the American spelling in the name, this is a gorgeous little app teaching you about the basics of colour science, through the medium of smart, interactive optical illusions.

It gets its polychromatic hooks into you with its sumptuous design and elegant tricks, and then takes the time to teach you exactly how and why your brain has let you down in that particular instance.

This is another of those apps that really showcases the unique powers of the iPad, and while it may not be especially heavyweight, it’s a lovely diversion and you will come away from it with your life enriched.

And that is that.

Source from The Independent, UK

Read Full Post »